Dungeon Fighter Online Class Choosing, Alts and Professions Guide

Dungeon Fighter Online Class Choosing, Alts and Professions Guide by ActaSanctum

Choosing A Class

Picking and choosing a class is overwhelming to many new and aspiring players. There’s so many of them, and tons of them look good. They might even be tempted to play a class immediately that truly catches their eyes.

But then they think…”What if this class is trash?” or “What if I can’t do endgame raids or endgame content when I reach cap level with this class?”. Or something similar, you know the kind. I know as an old veteran from many MMOs, I’ve actually had this same thought process as well. And in those games, it made sense. Some classes were just unplayable and extremely bad and looking up relevant tier lists would help further my hardcore gaming career.

And this brings me to my first tip.

Tip #1: Relying on Tier Lists is a Bad Idea!

You’ve heard it right. Picking a class based upon a tier list you came across is just a downright silly idea for DFO. There’s several reasons why and to make it easier for you, I’ll put it in a list.

1. Balance is ever changing in DFO

Neople always keeps tweaking and changing balances for classes. One day a class that was originally at F rank could immediately jump to A rank within a few weeks. Rangers, for example, used to be SSSSS tier, but jumped down to A tier or so after a few balance changes!

2. Tier lists are opinion based rather than straight up factual.

If you’ve watched the video MT and I created up top, you’ll notice I’m going through several tier lists by a variety of users. One from China, one from a forum, and one from even a reddit user. In each one, classes are tiered differently.

Additional Tip: Generally speaking though, Crusaders are always God tier because they are the only dedicated support class in the entire game. And this is in regards to PvE and partying late game.

3. Tier Lists are normally based upon extreme situations, not normal PvE or PvP.

Take for instance, the Anton Raid tier lists. Anton Raid is an end game raid that involves 20 players. To even stand a chance in the Anton Raid, at the bare minimum you need a full set of chronicle gear, and even then you’d be underpowered. Chronicle gear, for those unaware, are one of the end game gear sets in the game.

So to create a class that you think is great for Anton is just foolhardy. By the time you reach that point where you can even think about challenging Anton, you’d be a hardcore veteran yourself and you won’t even have to rely on tier lists to begin with!

So that’s all the reasons why relying on tier lists is just a bad idea. I’m sure others can come up with more, but in my opinion, those three are the biggest ones.

Tip #2: All Classes can Dominate in PvE

This follows right alongside one of the reasons why Tier Lists is just a bad idea (number 3 to be specific). Believe it or not, this is common knowledge among the veteran community. Dungeons are just ridiculously easy. The only time you may end up encountering difficulty is when you do hell or otherverse. Don’t even consider Anton Raid for now, even I’m not experienced enough to take on that Raid.

Otherverse is doable with every class and so is Hell and other PvE modes. All you need is the right gear and the right amount of skill. Especially for Otherverse, skill is a prerequisite as not knowing the map or mobs beforehand will definitely lead to your parties demise. I’ll eventually do a video tutorial on all the otherverse dungeons but that’s much later.

To see if a class you fancy can do well in PvE, just look them up on youtube. A nice youtube video that encompases everyone is here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3h_D1_1Urc

Tip #3: Percentage vs Fixed

This isn’t really a tip but it’s something you should know before making your class decision. In fact, some of you might even be aware of this and would try to pick a class based on these two systems.

Let’s first define both percentage and fixed:

Percentage: Some skills will be affected directly by the reinforcement on your weapon. If a skill is percentage based, this means a higher reinforced weapon would make the skill deal more damage as a direct result.

Additional Notes: The NPC Kiri is the one you want to go to to add more reinforcement to your weaponry. It’s expensive though so be careful. I won’t cover reinforcement in this guide but I might in a later one (could be an entire topic on its own). This is why you see some armor or weapons with +1, +4, etc. in front of the name.

Advice: Also, because of how expensive reinforcing can get, I recommend against reinforcing for beginners. You outlevel your equips early on so it’d be a wasted venture. Start reinforcing late game (level 55+ is my recommendation) if you need a stronger weapon.

Fixed: Skills that are not affected by weapon rating, so whatever damage the skill states in its description will always be the damage it deals.

Now, I already know what you are thinking. At first glance, you might consider a class with percentage skills to be the best choice. After all, with enough gear reinforcement, the class can be pretty overpowered. But, that’s actually not true and here’s two reasons why:

  1. Percentage classes do not truly outshine fixed classes till you get a +13 honestly. But a +13, to the majority of people, is out of reach and extremely expensive. Each upgrade cost is exponential, and an upgrade has a chance of failure (which only increases the higher the upgrade gets) that can break your weapon. So, normally on the market, most average players will never be able to afford such a highly upgraded weapon.
  2. Majority of classes are a mixed bag. They have fixed and percentage skills. So either way, you should be set.

Additional Notes: Aim to get a +11-12 weapon end game. It’s not too expensive and it’ll be helpful for your runs. That’s more than enough to do almost every content in this game.

And that’s pretty much all I have to say about fixed and percentage. Know that majority-fixed class will be more cost-effective since they don’t require a highly upgraded weapon (though it’s definitely helpful!).

Tip #4: Pick Whatever Class that Catches Your Interest

Let’s bring it all together. You should pick a class that you think you’ll end up enjoying. My personal tip is to try out that class till level 35. That’s only a few days worth of FP bars, so it won’t take up that much of your time. If you don’t like it, no harm in trying another class.

There are a ton of veterans that have tried out many classes throughout their career in DFO. Even I’ve tried out many classes and normally, I don’t have alts in games. So there really is no downside to testing. And you even might end up liking several classes!

If you want to check out what classes are in the game, here’s a link to the DFO Wiki: http://wiki.dfo-world.com/

Importance of Alts

Alts are surprisingly important in DFO. I say surprisingly because you don’t see alts being as heavily encouraged in other MMOs as you do in DFO. First off, we know that this game has fatigue, limiting the amount of time you can play to begin with. Each character you create has their own fatigue bar, so you can actually extend the amount of hours you can play by playing on multiple characters.

A bit of trivia from Regdren: Marvel Heroes also encourages alts. Getting a character to high level allows you to give a stat bonus to your other characters; the bonus depends on the giver’s specialty. Also once you max out a character, an experience bonus multiplier is given to all other characters. This increases for each maxed character.

But that’s just some facts. Let’s talk about three systems Neople has (or will!) implement in order to encourage you to make alts.

System #1: Adventurer’s System!

There is a system that will eventually introduce account-wide buffs and that’s the Adventurer’s System. This means every single one of your characters on your account will be affected by the buffs. And the way to earn these buffs is through Alts.

Note: Just to be clear, know that this system has yet to be introduced in DFO Global.

Turns out the system is already in place! Not sure how I missed that, I must really be out of it.

Let’s go into the specifics. Level 40 or higher characters will earn you points in your Adventurer’s status. The higher leveled your characters, the more points you will earn. Adventurer’s System has several levels to it, going up to level 10. And at level 10, Adventurer’s buffs will add a total of 170 to all your stats!

However, don’t get too excited. In order to reach level 10, you’ll need 15 level 85 characters! The other levels are definitely doable at least. Here’s a brief list of the requirements for each level:

  • Level 0: N/A
  • Level 1: 1375 experience
  • Level 2: 5425 experience
  • Level 3: 10850 experience
  • Level 4: 21700 experience
  • Level 5: 37975 experience
  • Level 6: 54250 experience
  • Level 7: 75950 experience
  • Level 8: 101000 experience
  • Level 9: 126000 experience
  • Level 10: 146625 experience

To know how much experience each level gives, here’s a link:


It’s a bit outdated since it doesn’t have anything beyond level 70. Know that level 80 gives you 8200 points while level 85 gives you 9775 points.

And before we end this section, know also that by having alts, you will get a 10% clear bonus experience for every character except your highest leveled one.

System #2: Mercenary System!

This is another system that encourages alts in this game. Using this system, you are allowed to send out your characters on a ‘mission’ to go gather items and goods. Only available to level 70s or higher.

The way it works is like this. You get an option later on to send out your characters for a set duration. During that duration, you cannot run dungeons with that character. After your character returns from his or her ‘missions’, you will gain loot. These loots range anywhere from hell scrolls to chronicle gear and quest items. And the higher leveled you are, the better loot you will gain.

The times at which you can send away characters is 2 hour, 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 2 days, 7 days, and 14 days. The longer you send them away, the better chance of better loot!

And that’s pretty much all you need to know for this system. My personal recommendation is to send out a character every 2 hours when you are grinding on an alt, and 6 hours when you sleep! If you go on vacation and know you won’t be playing, you can pick any of the longer options.

System #3: Assist System!

This is both MT’s and my favorite of the three. Once you hit level 50, you are allowed to ‘link’ up your characters with another character. Once you do, you can easily share any active skill that is level 35, 40, and 45. These are the few facts you should be aware of:

  1. The game immediately assumes the character ‘assisting’ you has a +12 rare weapon. So the damage done by these skills may actually be greater than the original character.
  2. You have a global cooldown. This means in a party, once someone uses the skill, the cooldown activates for all party members. In other words, you cannot activate your assist skill if someone else just did.
  3. You can only use assist skills in normal PvE. This means no altars, towers, true ancients, etc.

So let’s put all we’ve learned altogether…

Tip #5: Create Alts!

You most likely knew this was coming. Basically, create alts and experiment! The game encourages you to do so to begin with, and one fatigue bar is probably not enough, right? So give it a try and who knows? You might find another class worth playing!

Importance of Professions

Professions are a big part of DFO and can really determine how you end up playing the game. It can help you out in dungeons, make you tons of money, and more. In this section, I’ll cover each of the professions and my personal advice in regards to them. Know that this is a beginner’s guide, so any advanced information such as types of mats given from a specific kind of equip grind won’t be given (I’ll leave that info to someone else!).

Also know that if you have four alts, you can just pick up all four professions! There are no classes that would benefit from a particular profession since that’s opinion based (depends on skill/level/balance/goals).

But before anything, let’s go over what to do about all those non-white and non-blue equips!

Tip #6: Profession Grinding!

Each profession, besides disassembler profession, has their own personal profession disassembler. Note that when I say personal profession disassembler, I mean the machine you get that outputs profession-only items when you grind equips in it. The disassembler profession does not have this, they just have a normal disassembler that anyone can use.

Know that I won’t cover chronicle/epic gear grinding since, if you have chronicle/epic gear, you’ll already know what you are doing. However, if in the off chance you acquired some, just follow the same advice I give for uniques.

Magic Seals/Rares:

Let’s first go over magic seal/rare weapons. Most likely, after a week of playing, you would have seen an accumulation of magic seal goods. I had recommended in the first part not to grind them and instead convert them into an equip of your choice.

But what if you have too many? And too low leveled? Then I recommend to grind them up in your personal profession disassembler, such as an alchemy disassembler. You can get pretty good items from the profession-specific disassembler. I still advocate not to grind them in a normal disassembler since you won’t get much at all. For normal rares, a normal disassembler or disassembler shop works.


That’s for magic seals and rares. How about uniques? There’s several choices when it comes to uniques. If it’s untradeable, either grind it in your personal profession disassembler, or find a high leveled (7+ is good) disassembler shop that’s open and grind them up there. It’s your choice.

For tradeable, you have a few more options. Either sell it on the AH, grind them up in your personal profession disassembler, or find a high leveled player disassembler shop and grind them there. Again, you should decide on a case by case basis.

The reason behind grinding uniques at a normal disassembler (not at a personal profession version) is to get high elemental crystals. Those are really handy later on, especially when you find an epic recipe (you’ll need a ton of them!).

Fun Fact: The reason why you find some uniques as untradeable is because they are boss uniques. The ones that can be traded are normal uniques! Normal uniques drop most frequently from specialty dungeons, which have a gold border on the dungeon map.

Additional Note: Also know that you can upgrade your profession personal disassembler for a better version that can output better/more items! Do this at Abello. And you also get a daily quest everyday to trade in some items for profession related materials.

Profession #1: Disassembler!

This profession is a simple one and so I’ll just go straight to some facts.

  1. Leveling. To level up as a profession disassembler, all you need to do is have others use your shop. One of the easier professions to level up as all you need to do is go AFK often.
  2. Upgrading. Even though you may level up as a disassembler, know that your shop does not level up immediately. You need to purposely upgrade your shop.
  3. Repairing. Your disassembler in your shop has durability. So you’ll need to repair. The higher leveled your shop (not your actual level), the higher the repair costs.
  4. Fees. You can set a price for disassembling. That means, for others to use your shop, they would need to pay. You make money this way.

Now that that’s covered, I’ll go over a personal tactic of mine when it comes to leveling/upgrading:

  • Do not upgrade your shop immediately. Stagger your upgrades, as repair fees will only increase and you won’t make a profit early on anyway.
  • Know that you base your fees on other disassembler shops. If a level 4 is selling at 100, minimum, then you can definitely make a profit selling at 90 or so.
  • Upgrade to level 5 from level 1 in one go, then upgrade to level 7 for durability boost. Afterwards you can hit 9 and 11.
  • Know that I skipped 3 as it’s not profitable at the current market. This can change, just keep a lookout for market trends going on right now.
  • You increase your repair shop by 2 each time as the higher odd numbers gives out more/better items when you grind items.

Additional Notes: Also I believe the normal NPC disassembler is level 4. In order to stay competitive with as little costs as possible, I highly recommend jumping straight to 5 from level 1.

UPDATE: Apparently level 7 Disassembler does not have a durability boost. Does anyone know the level for the durability boost? Most likely it’s level 9.

I’ll just leave you with another fact before I go onto the next profession. There are disassembler dolls. I’m not sure yet if they are in DFOG, but eventually you can get a doll to set up shop for you. This way you can dungeon or do whatever you want, while the doll manages the shop.

Profession #2: Enchanter!

Enchanters and disassemblers are similar to each other. They both have shops. The key difference is that, for enchanters, their shop level increases automatically as you level up.

As we’ve covered before, Enchanters also have their own personal profession disassembler. With their disassembler, you can get mana essences or low grade elemental crystals.

Anyway, I do not recommend this profession to newbies. There’s only two real reasons why you would want to be an enchanter (unless you have many alts of course). Either you plan to make profit by selling your services to high end players much later on, or you want to use their personal profession disassembler to get low grade elemental crystals (those are really useful!). You’ll use these items to power your shop as well.

Enchanters can enchant weapons with cards or make beads with enchanted effects. Normally, people with end game items will want to enchant their equips to make it marginally stronger than they already are.

Now, let’s cover the simpler professions.

Profession #3: Animators!

This profession is really beginner friendly and simple to understand. You make APCs, basically NPCs you can summon in dungeons, to help you out when grinding. They are used up like any consumable so you’ll need to make more if you run out.

The way to make animations is to first go to Abello and buy the recipe you want. Higher leveled Animators can make higher leveled APCs. And then you craft up your APC using the materials asked for in the recipe. Know that once you buy a recipe, you won’t need to buy it again (it will be logged for you in your profession menu).

Your profession personal disassembler spits out all the items you’ll need to create your APCs. So by grinding equips in that, you’ll get the materials needed to craft your APCs. The higher grade the equips, the more/better the materials.

Profession #4: Alchemists!

Also very beginner friendly. Alchemists are exactly like Animators except, instead of APCs, they make potions. This could be HP,MP, fatigue, or more. Though we don’t have access to fatigue potions just yet! Apparently we do, whoops!

Just for consistency, I’ll list out all you need to know again. Get recipes from Abello, open up profession menu to create potions, and if you need materials, use your profession personal disassembler.

And that’s pretty much it!

Added Information: You can get golden cube fragments from disassembling equips at dissassembler shops. Higher the level, the higher chance of it. Golden cube frags come in handy later on so try to stock up on it. Also note that apparently the shop dolls are already in the game. I didn’t notice!

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One Response to “Dungeon Fighter Online Class Choosing, Alts and Professions Guide”

  1. Tier lists are as viable information as your opinion that they’re not, after all, it’s like you can just tell that a class is absolute shit, has been neglected for years, or is just better than everyone else for the type of playstyle one desires; DPS, CC, Buff, Debuff, etc. etc…

    Dogging on Tier Lists constantly is a waste of breath..

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