Gunbound Trico Guide



Gunbound Trico Guide by Creedo

It is raining now, and lightning keeps on striking my router, forcing me to quit
the game with inukiM and other GBA dudes. For this reason, + I’m kind of free, I
will translate the Shen Pu (knat) ‘s Trico 3 in 1 guide for you guys.

I haven’t really tested his method, because it seems harder than DarkSword
(knat) ‘s method which I have been using for a long time. Anyway, the original
link:

1. Shen Pu’s Trico 3 in 1 guide in Chinese –
http://www.ibfchina.com/index.php?showtopic=44577
2. DarkSword’s Trico 3 in 1 guide in Chinese –
http://www.tankbb.com/bbs/real_list….id_check=0&x;=0

I will start the translation now. (And might skip some less important parts)

There are two shooting methods in GB which have been widely used by the users
since long time ago due to their simplicity and effectiveness, i.e.

1. Fixed power method (Adjust angle, e.g. Half toss, full power, etc.)
2. Fixed angle method (Adjust power, e.g. Mage-60, boomer-89, etc.)

Fixed angle method is harder than fixed power method, users need to memorize the
‘distance-power’ table and they need to calculate the power due to affection of
resulting wind force, but anyway, to most pros, this method is considered easy,
it takes only two steps.

Both of the methods above are the mainstream methods in GB, based on them, alot
of new methods are born. But, a new calculation is born because of the emergence
of trico (and its users) i.e. Fixed timing method (Adjust power and angle).

Technically, this method is far more difficult than both mentioned methods,
however, a player still need both of the methods as basis of mastering Fixed
timing method.

Let’s stop crapping and get into the topic, i.e. Trico’s 3 in 1 calculation.

Alot of players might think that the miraculous 3 in 1 shot is done due to
luckiness, which actually is based on certain principles. After spending my time
on research, I found out the principles, and through these princpiles, I come
out with calculations, which are the the steps below:

1. Apply the base power. Which is the power (under 0 wind condition) for
hitting 3 in 1 when both users are on the same horizon.

Left->Right: 1.5 ; 2.6 ; 3.6 ; 4.6
Right->Left: 0.9 ; 2.2 ; 3.2 ; 4.2

(Note: 4.2 and 4.6 are used on tail or vertical wind)

I suggest you all to practice the power above in some 0 wind stages.

2. Calculate the shooting power

Power needs to readjust due to the wind affection. Here are two principles to
remember:

a. Tail/Up wind: Reduce power
b. Opposite/Down wind: Add power

The exact data:

a. Upward vertical wind: For each 2 wind power, reduce 0.05 power.
b. Tail wind (horizontal): For each 5 wind power, reduce 0.05 power.
c. Downward vertical wind: For each 2 wind power, add 0.05 power.
d. Opposite wind (horizontal): For each 5 wind power, add 0.05 power.

You can deduce the power to change for other winds from the data above.

Another thing to consider it the horizontal line, for most cases, when target
is located about 2 mobiles height above you, add 0.05 power; if the target is
lower than you for about 2 mobiles height, reduce 0.05 power.

3. Deduce screen distance from shooting power

After knowing the power to use, you have to calculate the angle. The first
step in calculating angle is to get the screen distance. The data below are
screen distances for different shooting powers, I tested them with
=ShangHai=HongHong (knat) , thanks for his wonderful effort.

2.0 power: 24.0(h)
2.1 power: 22.0(h)
2.2 power: 20.0(h)
2.3 power: 18.0(h)
2.4 power: 16.0(h) 50.0(f)
2.5 power: 14.0(h) 40.0(f)
2.6 power: 13.0(h) 30.0(f)
2.7 power: 12.0(h) 28.0(f)
2.8 power: 11.0(h) 26.0(f)
2.9 power: 10.5(h) 24.0(f)
3.0 power: 10.0(h) 22.0(f)
3.1 power: 9.5(h) 20.0(f)
3.2 power: 9.0(h) 18.0(f)
3.3 power: 8.5(h) 17.0(f)
3.4 power: 8.0(h) 16.0(f)
3.5 power: 7.5(h) 15.0(f)
3.6 power: 7.5(h) 14.0(f)
3.7 power: 7.0(h) 13.5(f)
3.8 power: 6.5(h) 13.0(f)
3.9 power: 6.5(h) 12.5(f)
4.0 power: 6.0(h) 12.1(f)

The definition of 1 full screen distance is quite ambiguous, some say from left
edge to right edge, some say from the left edge of “Esc” button to the right
edge of “F8” button; But anyway, if I were not wrong, Shen Pu’s 1 full screen
definition is the latter one I mentioned just now.

To apply the data above, let’s say you are using 3.2 power, 90 – (9.0) = hitting
half screen, 90 – (18.0) = hitting one screen.

4. Deduce target distance from screen distance

For this step, it’s quite simple, but to make it accurate you need alot of
experience. The way I calculate distance is to use the object in screen to
calculate. For instance, if enemy is located right after “All”button, and half
screen distance = 14 angle, then, your target distance will be 0.5*14 = 7.

5. Calculate angle to compensate with wind

For those who’s good in Half Toss, it might not a big problem for you, because
the wind chart is almost the same.

http://www.geocities.com/yuenqe/HalfToss.Wind.Chart.txt

This is the wind chart of Half Toss, the wind factor works for shooting power
around 3.0. For most of the cases it might just work fine; for 2.0 power, the
result you get might have to be reduced by 2; for 2.5 power, the result has to
be reduced by 1. Again, practice and learn from experience.

6. Collecting all the data and shoot

The formula is:

Angle: 90 – (target distance = step 4) + half toss angle (- for opposite wind
direction = step 5)
Power: The result of step 2

And you will see 3 cabbages draw beautiful curves in the sky and all 3 hit the
enemy in 1. As if you miss, it might still be 3 in 1 but hitting the ground.

What I can say is.. Formula can only be a way to help you to gain experience,
to be more accurate and perfect in shooting, what you have to do is practice
again and again. I have been asking Koreans for some tips and what they told me
is: “Just practice more and more.” I think this is the ultimate “guide” of pros.
Remember, this is always true: “Practice makes perfect.”

Written by Shen Pu (knat) : 30-Sep-03
Updated: 09-Feb-04

I hope you guys will appreciate this article and my effort to translate it. =)
Those notes that I added above are in italic form.
————–
about http://media.virtuafighter.com/media…ico_shenpu.txt
.. it’s a good guide, I’m told, though I have yet to use the formulas. I thought
they were pretty clear but I’ll try to explain in my own words. If it helps people use
trico then I am glad.

Quote:
1. Apply the base power. Which is the power (under 0 wind condition) for
hitting 3 in 1 when both users are on the same horizon.

Left->Right: 1.5 ; 2.6 ; 3.6 ; 4.6
Right->Left: 0.9 ; 2.2 ; 3.2 ; 4.2

(Note: 4.2 and 4.6 are used on tail or vertical wind)

For shenpu’s 3in1 aiming formula, you must calculate the power to use first, then follow up
by calculating the angle. When you use the power levels described above, you will get a
3in1 vs an enemy who is roughly level with you, as long as the shot isn’t being affected
by wind… and as long as you choose the correct angle.
Your goal should be to use the lowest power level you possibly can. For example,
shooting –> you want to use 1.5 if the enemy is close enough to hit with it (first spin).
If they’re too far away to hit with 1.5 bars of power, you want to switch to 2.6 bars
(which is enough power to keep the shot in the air long enough for 2 spins). This
power is good for over half a screen, probably close to 1 full screen distance.
However you will sometimes have wind fightning your shot so even 2.6 bars of power
isn’t enough to hit a faraway target. You must then switch to 3.6 bars of power,
with the goal being to hit on the 3rd rotation of your shot instead of the 2nd.
The 4.6 obviously is not possible in 0 wind conditions, and is just another way of
saying that if the wind is blowing your shot upwards and keeping it airborne for
a long time, sometimes you can get 4 complete spins by shooting with full power.
Hitting an enemy with this is sorta lucky and showing off, 3.6 bars is enough power
for most situations.

So to review: The first step of the calculation is to know the power levels listed.
Decide which power level you think can travel far enough to hit the enemy,
but don’t use more power than you need to… if you can hit them on the first spin,
that’s easier than hitting them on the 2nd spin, etc.

Next step:

Quote:
2. Calculate the shooting power

Power needs to readjust due to the wind affection. Here are two principles to
remember:

a. Tail/Up wind: Reduce power
b. Opposite/Down wind: Add power

The exact data:

a. Upward vertical wind: For each 2 wind power, reduce 0.05 power.
b. Tail wind (horizontal): For each 5 wind power, reduce 0.05 power.
c. Downward vertical wind: For each 2 wind power, add 0.05 power.
d. Opposite wind (horizontal): For each 5 wind power, add 0.05 power.

You can deduce the power to change for other winds from the data above.

Another thing to consider it the horizontal line, for most cases, when target
is located about 2 mobiles height above you, add 0.05 power; if the target is
lower than you for about 2 mobiles height, reduce 0.05 power.

So once you have chosen your basic power, how to deal with wind? If there’s no wind, you
don’t want to change your power usually… the power levels listed are just right for 0
wind. If the wind is pointing up, you need to reduce power by 1/20th of a bar for every
2 wind strength pointing up. If the wind is pointing down, you just do the opposite and
add 1/20th of a bar. So if the wind is pointing 10 straight down, add 5/20th’s of a bar
(which translates to 1/4th bar). If wind is 18 down, add 9/20th’s of a bar (just a bit
less than half a bar). Basically use less power if wind is blowing upwards because the
wind will keep the shot airborne long enough for your 3in1. Use more power if the wind
is pointing downward, otherwise the basic power levels listed earlier won’t be enough,
the shot will underspin and land flat.

For wind that is pointing left or right, you will add or subtract power based on whether
the wind is helping your shot or holding it back. He recommends adding 1/20th for every
5 wind, or reducing 1/20th for every 5 wind. That means that the most you’ll ever adjust
your power (in the strongest wind, 26) is by about 5/20th’s… i.e. 1/4th of a bar.

Lastly, he is mentioning that if the enemy is above or below you, power needs to change.
For 2 mobile heights higher than you, add 1/20th of a bar of power to your shot, and if
the enemy is 2 mobile heights below you, subtract the same amount.

So all the math in part 1 and 2 means you should have the correct power for a 3in1 as long
as you factored in the following things
*Is the power level you chose enough to reach the enemy,
especially if the enemy is far away?
*Did you add or reduce power based on the wind? He gives formulas for four different wind
directions, but of course there are many wind directions and you’ll need to probably make
some guesses based on wind that is somewhere between up/down/left/right.
*Did you add or reduce power a bit for enemies who are not level with you?
Even on metamine you will have to make shots vs enemies who are a bit above or below you.

If you did all of this, you have the power for a 3in1, and you must commit to using
this exact power level. All you need to do now is calculate the angle.

Quote:
3. Deduce screen distance from shooting power

After knowing the power to use, you have to calculate the angle. The first
step in calculating angle is to get the screen distance. The data below are
screen distances for different shooting powers, I tested them with
=ShangHai=HongHong (knat) , thanks for his wonderful effort.

2.0 power: 24.0(h)
2.1 power: 22.0(h)
2.2 power: 20.0(h)
2.3 power: 18.0(h)
2.4 power: 16.0(h) 50.0(f)
2.5 power: 14.0(h) 40.0(f)
2.6 power: 13.0(h) 30.0(f)
2.7 power: 12.0(h) 28.0(f)
2.8 power: 11.0(h) 26.0(f)
2.9 power: 10.5(h) 24.0(f)
3.0 power: 10.0(h) 22.0(f)
3.1 power: 9.5(h) 20.0(f)
3.2 power: 9.0(h) 18.0(f)
3.3 power: 8.5(h) 17.0(f)
3.4 power: 8.0(h) 16.0(f)
3.5 power: 7.5(h) 15.0(f)
3.6 power: 7.5(h) 14.0(f)
3.7 power: 7.0(h) 13.5(f)
3.8 power: 6.5(h) 13.0(f)
3.9 power: 6.5(h) 12.5(f)
4.0 power: 6.0(h) 12.1(f)

The definition of 1 full screen distance is quite ambiguous, some say from left
edge to right edge, some say from the left edge of “Esc” button to the right
edge of “F8” button; But anyway, if I were not wrong, Shen Pu’s 1 full screen
definition is the latter one I mentioned just now.

To apply the data above, let’s say you are using 3.2 power, 90 – (9.0) = hitting
half screen, 90 – (18.0) = hitting one screen.

This chart is listing various power levels you might have come up with as a result of steps
1 and 2.

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